Getting Involved

Helping victims in war torn countries

Donations

Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Bo, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Kenema, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Makeni, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Port Loko, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Bo, Sierra Leone, West Africa
Sierra Care 2013 Christmas Outreach in Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa

Past Projects

Sierra Care Supports Hurricane Katrina Victims

By August 31st 2005, 80% of New Orleans was under 15 feet of water. Being a natural

disaster, many were not prepared or at the least expecting such to happen so quick and so disastrous. The many people that found refuge in Dallas were greeted by many including Sierra Care.

Sierra Care tapped into its used clothing and shoes bank, filled the needs of scores of people in the Dallas/Forth-worth Metropolitan area. The Executive Director drove from one hotel to another that housed hurricane victims and distributed both clothing and shoes to the storm victims.

The Sierra Leone War-Affected Amputee Camp

In January of 2002, David flew to Sierra Leone, visited the war-affected amputee camp and spent three days and nights with the amputees, provided food, distributed new and used clothing, shoes, bibles, pastors gave counselling and bible teachings and played soccer with these victimized folks.

The above soccer photograph was a sign of appreciation given to the Executive Director for his warm hospitality given to the amputees and their families. Their greatest hobby is soccer, but as you can see they are playing without shoes or jersey, the soccer ball has so many patches. They have asked me to inform the American public about their wonderful hobby but do not have the resources to play the game well.

The young woman on the wheelchair—is called Fatmata, her foot was amputated by the rebels. She was working in a salon as a hair stylist, after her amputation she was dismissed from the job, because her employer said she was slow. Her request to me was to help her have a small salon of her own, so that she can earn a decent living.

These guys that you see smiling while receiving the hair clippers from me are barbers or at least can cut their own hair. Coincidentally, I took some clippers with me to cut my own hairĀ as I always do. Upon arrival at the amputee camp I saw these guys with so much hair on their head, with no comb or treatment which obviously falls into the end product of unwanted dread on their head. I was able to talk to them about the need to keep low hair and keep it clean. They agreed–their reason was that they do not have the money to pay for a hair cut, so I gave them the clippers.

The above teenager, now a young man in his early twenties lost his entire family during the war, he is the only survivor to his close family, very eager to be educated. He is one of the reason why I think a learning center to teach basic skills is necessary for these folks. Skills that will make them productive and feed themselves .